Necklace by Anna Hu inspired by Monet’s lilies

Inspired by Claude Monet’s paintings of water lilies, Hu began working on the product concept as an aspiring 20-year-old artist.

Necklace by Anne Hu inspired by Monet's lilies

Before even a single stone was inserted into a necklace, it took jewelry designer Anna Hu ten years to come up with the design for the piece.

Inspired by Claude Monet’s paintings of water lilies, Hu began working on the product concept as a budding 20-year-old artist. “The images of the pond, the water, the play of light and shadow have always been an integral part of my memories from that time,” she says.

Painting “Water Lilies” by Claude Monet

I wanted to imitate waves, but at the same time create something very feminine and unique.

Anna listened to the music of impressionist composers, Ravel and Debussy, while working on the jewelry.

Deep pink sapphires symbolizing lilies, surrounded by emerald tsavorites, tourmalines, morganites, alexandrites, sapphires of gentle pastel colors, as well as white, pink and silver-gray diamonds with 45.22 carat cabochon tanzanite shape – a total of 1600 stones for 630 carats.

The stones are the colors I used to recreate Monet’s creations in a piece of jewelry

The necklace was not created by the designer for commercial purposes, although it may one day be sold. “It came from the heart and encapsulates a lot of spiritual and emotional experiences,” said Hu, who plans to display her one-of-a-kind creation in a new flagship boutique in Shanghai.

Necklace by Anna Hu, inspired by a painting by Monet

I don’t see this jewelry as a commercial product, so I’m not sure that I would sell it.

According to the designer, the piece was created to look at and touch.

It took two years to create the necklace. Five masters of the “French school” were involved in the process of bringing the design to life.

The basis for the whole placer of precious stones was the finest 18-carat white gold, a special weave that allows the jewelry to lie down in accordance with the curves of the body of the person who wears it as if it were a fabric.

Anna also said that a technique similar to the “plique-à-jour technique” of enameling was developed especially for this necklace.

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