The Marquis cut, inspired by the smile of Madame de Pompadour

Each cut is able to present the beauty of a stone in a new way, but it is difficult to find a more elegant form than the refined “Marquis,” which comes to us from the distant 18th century.

Stephen Webster ring with Marquis-cut aquamarines and tanzanites

The Marquise cut was born many years ago, during the reign of Louis XV. It is said that the king was so enchanted by his favorite, the Marquise de Pompadour, that he ordered his court jewelers to invent a new shape for the diamond that would capture the beauty of the smile of the young Jeanne-Antoinette. It was done, and the new cut was named after its inspirer.

The romantic story of the Marquise and Madame de Pompadour may be just a beautiful fairy tale, but the cut has eventually gained great popularity around the world for its graceful yet playful form. In addition, when set in a ring as a solitaire, the Marquise cut stone has the power to visually lengthen the fingers of its owner.

Dior ring with multicolored Marquesas

However, the aesthetic effect is not the only one that modern jewelers use. At the Paris Fashion Week held earlier this year, Dior demonstrated the Granville jewelry collection, which is a real festival of shape and color. Precious stones of different shapes are gathered in a whole bunch, sparkling and shimmering fantastically. One of the vivid examples is a ring with two large chrysoberyls, from which many-colored “Marquis” cut stones diverge in different directions, making shape and logic of proportions in a crazy kaleidoscope of colors.

Joana Salazar earrings with Marquis-cut emeralds

Brazilian jewelry designer Joana Salazar pays just as much attention to shape. She got her design education in Milan and studied gemology in India, and now she boldly realizes her ideas and fantasies in precious stones. One of the most spectacular jewelry pieces by Joan is the Petite Blossom emerald earrings. To convey the natural beauty of the stone in the most “organic” form, the jeweler gathered emeralds in large bunches, choosing the Marquis cut. As a result, the piece is simultaneously associated with tree foliage, splashback, and ice crystals.

Of course, you can count the names of jewelers and artists who fell in love with this spectacular cut once and for all for a long time: Sean Lin creates dynamic forms of wings and feathers with it; Stephen Webster makes entire collections based on this cut; and Carrera y Carrera uses Marquise to embody natural motifs. And we’ll probably mention one more name. Designer Elisabetta de Simone Niquesa makes colorful jewels with a variety of gemstones under her brand Niquesa.

Petali D’ Amore bracelet by Niquesa with Marquise-cut sapphires and diamonds

In one of her collections the designer not only used wonderful sapphires of this favorite shape but also framed each one in a gold “frame” resembling the shape of the stone.

Romantic and sensual shape of “Marquis” cut is truly versatile and can create a storm waterfall of precious stones, as well as sparkling fireworks that create a playful mood. It is safe to say that this shape has earned a place of honor among the most popular and well-known along with the classic round brilliant and emerald cuts.

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